Women With Type 1 Diabetes ‘Twice As Likely’ As Men To Die From Heart Disease

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas is unable to produce adequate levels of insulin to convert sugars, starches and other types of foods into energy. The disease is widespread in the USA, with about 15,000 children and 15,000 adults being diagnosed yearly. The biggest increase of cases of the disease is in children. A recent study conducted by researchers from the School of Public Health in Queensland, Australia, revealed that women with Type 1 diabetes had a 37% higher risk of death from any cause than men, and twice the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, a 37% higher risk of stroke, and a 44% higher risk of dying from kidney disease than their male counterparts.

Type 1 diabetes is a serious condition, and is known to shorten the life expectancy of those who suffer from it. The reasons behind why women are far more likely to die of heart disease is not fully understood, and it may be years or decades before further research reveals the underlying reason for the greatly increased risk of death from heart disease and other conditions for women.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women who have diabetes, and they are twice as likely to suffer from a second heart attack as well as four times more likely to have heart failure than women without the disease. There are various risky behaviors that if avoided, can assist in reducing the risk, including the following:

  • No Smoking

  • Keep Blood Pressure in a Healthy Range

  • Stay at a Healthy Weight for Your Height

  • Exercise on a Regular Basis

  • Consume a Low-Fat Diet

  • Manage Diabetes Correctly

  • Know Your Family History

  • Stay Alert for Chest Pain or Other Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there are 24.6 million adults with diabetes in 2010, and 12.6 million of these adults were women. As heart disease is known to be the most common complication associated with diabetes, it is not the sole problem that women suffering from the disease face. They are also at far higher risk of blindness, and have a much shorter life expectancy, with death rates three times higher than women who do not have diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children or young adults, but can also be found in persons of any age. It is an autoimmune disease that is believed to be caused by various factors, including genetic propensity, environmental issues or other unidentified factors. There is currently no method by which the disease can be prevented, and treatment will require the use of insulin. The disease is rampant, and the CDC reports that there are 21.0 million people suffering from some form of diabetes, and it estimates that there are currently 8.1 million people who have the disease have not yet been diagnosed. See your doctor and focus on living a healthy lifestyle. As the cause of the disease is unknown, this may be beneficial in avoiding it. If you have been diagnosed, carefully follow the advice of your doctor to reduce your chances heart disease as a complication.

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