A Diabetes Drug May Help Obese Women Conceive And Have Healthier Children

Women who are suffering from obesity often have great difficulty in becoming pregnant. Many of these women choose to have infertility treatments to help them to conceive. Once the child or children are born, the children are much more prone to suffer from obesity themselves – a problem of great concern. A new diabetes drug that is currently in clinical trials may be the answer to this problem. Researchers who developed the new drug found that the problem originates in the mitochondria in the mother’s eggs.

What are Mitochondria?

Mitochondria are tiny compartments that are present in every cell in the body, and that perform many diverse and vital functions to keep the body healthy. One of the most critical functions is the conversion of the energy from food into energy that can be then be used by the cell. The mitochondria function almost like a miniature battery in cells, and when damaged, often self-destruct. The energy-making qualities of mitochondria is usually damaged in obese women, and this cell damage is also present in their eggs. The children are then born with damaged mitochondria, and a propensity for obesity, just like the mother.

Cellular stress can damage all parts of the body, including liver, pancreas and brain. A genetic mutation in the mice caused them to overeat and become obese. The scientists closely monitored the cell stress of these obese mice and whether the activity in the mitochondria was affected, as well as the eggs when used in IVF (in vitro fertilization). This led to the discovery that the mitochondria in the mice had been damaged. The mice born from these eggs also were found to have lower mitochondrial activity, and a higher propensity for obesity.

A new diabetes drug that is currently in clinical trials may have found a treatment for this problem. So far, the drug has proven to be effective when tested on obese mice, and showed lower levels of cellular stress and higher levels of mitochondrial activity. When the eggs of the obese mice treated with the drug (called BGP-15) were then fertilized and transferred to mouse “surrogate mothers,” they did not develop into overweight fetuses.

Both parents contribute DNA to a child, but the mitochondria from the mother’s eggs are the basis for the mitochondria developed in every cell in the child’s body. This diabetes drug may have shed a light on how obesity is passed onto children, and offer new hope to obese women hoping to conceive and have healthier children as well.

Sources:

A Diabetes Drug May Help Obese Women Conceive And Have Healthier Children Feb27

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Women With Type 1 Diabetes ‘Twice As Likely’ As Men To Die From Heart Disease

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas is unable to produce adequate levels of insulin to convert sugars, starches and other types of foods into energy. The disease is widespread in the USA, with about 15,000 children and 15,000 adults being diagnosed yearly. The biggest increase of cases of the disease is in children. A recent study conducted by researchers from the School of Public Health in Queensland, Australia, revealed that women with Type 1 diabetes had a 37% higher risk of death from any cause than men, and twice the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, a 37% higher risk of stroke, and a 44% higher risk of dying from kidney disease than their male counterparts.

Type 1 diabetes is a serious condition, and is known to shorten the life expectancy of those who suffer from it. The reasons behind why women are far more likely to die of heart disease is not fully understood, and it may be years or decades before further research reveals the underlying reason for the greatly increased risk of death from heart disease and other conditions for women.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women who have diabetes, and they are twice as likely to suffer from a second heart attack as well as four times more likely to have heart failure than women without the disease. There are various risky behaviors that if avoided, can assist in reducing the risk, including the following:

  • No Smoking

  • Keep Blood Pressure in a Healthy Range

  • Stay at a Healthy Weight for Your Height

  • Exercise on a Regular Basis

  • Consume a Low-Fat Diet

  • Manage Diabetes Correctly

  • Know Your Family History

  • Stay Alert for Chest Pain or Other Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there are 24.6 million adults with diabetes in 2010, and 12.6 million of these adults were women. As heart disease is known to be the most common complication associated with diabetes, it is not the sole problem that women suffering from the disease face. They are also at far higher risk of blindness, and have a much shorter life expectancy, with death rates three times higher than women who do not have diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children or young adults, but can also be found in persons of any age. It is an autoimmune disease that is believed to be caused by various factors, including genetic propensity, environmental issues or other unidentified factors. There is currently no method by which the disease can be prevented, and treatment will require the use of insulin. The disease is rampant, and the CDC reports that there are 21.0 million people suffering from some form of diabetes, and it estimates that there are currently 8.1 million people who have the disease have not yet been diagnosed. See your doctor and focus on living a healthy lifestyle. As the cause of the disease is unknown, this may be beneficial in avoiding it. If you have been diagnosed, carefully follow the advice of your doctor to reduce your chances heart disease as a complication.

Sources:

Women With Type 1 Diabetes ‘Twice As Likely’ As Men To Die From Heart Disease Feb24

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Diabetic Diet: Myths and Helpers

diabetic diet

Know what is in your food

Diabetes, without a doubt, makes it challenging for people to plan their diet and make sure they are not putting their health at risk. Among various theories and myths surrounding both types of diabetes, there several scientifically proven points that anyone with diabetes should know about. How to control your blood glucose levels and lead a balanced life? Here are several tips you can follow to avoid glucose crashes and sustain its healthy level.

Choose your Carbohydrates wisely

To control your blood glucose better, try to increase the intake of complex carbohydrates and reduce the intake of simple ones. Simple carbohydrates raise your glucose levels more quickly; however, the effect fades quickly, too. That is why a quick chocolate bar can do the trick for the moment but not for the whole day. To avoid glucose crash that tends to happen after having received an intake of simple carbohydrates, and to ensure more steady levels of glucose in your blood, consume more of complex carbohydrates. They take more time to digest and also contain more nutrients thus they are definitely the way to go.  Foods that are rich in complex carbohydrates are beans, whole-grain products, vegetables, brown rice, etc. Oatmeal for breakfast thus can keep up your blood sugar better than cornflakes with chocolate bits. Meals containing complex carbohydrates will also less likely result in food cravings as your glucose levels will not fluctuate so quickly.

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FDA Responds to Actos Side Effects Reports, Orders On-going Study

ActosActos is a medication in the class of drugs known as thiazolidinediones (TZD) which help those with Type 2 diabetes regulate glucose levels. Although exercise and a healthy diet can help regulate blood sugar, medication is sometimes the only way some are able to control their diabetes.

Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1999, Actos (pioglitazone hydrochloride), manufactured by Takeda Pharmaceuticals, has been tied to serious side effects including, bladder cancer, congestive heart failure, and bone fractures. Adverse event reports received by the FDA prompted the federal agency to order a 10 year safety review of the medication.  Meanwhile, adverse events have also prompted litigation as Takeda continues to be named in a growing number of Actos lawsuits filed nationwide.

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Managing Type II Diabetes — Medication Free!

Managing Type II Diabetes

Managing Type II Diabetes

Type II diabetes is a serious health condition that affects millions of individuals living around the world. While type II diabetes was once considered to be associated with those only in their golden years, many adolescents—and even children—have begun to develop the disorder more and more frequently. In most cases, patients who are diagnosed with type II diabetes are encouraged to rely on prescription medications and insulin injections to keep blood sugar levels in check. However, there are a number of other, less invasive techniques that can be just as effective when it comes to the management of this condition. Research shows that regular exercise, a healthy diet, adequate rest, and checking blood sugar levels on a regular basis is highly successful when it comes to the regulation of type II diabetes.

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